new poem up at tahoma literary review!

Just a quick post to share the release of the latest issue of Tahoma Literary Review which includes my poem “A Mu’allaqa for Clifton Avenue!”

This issue is available for free PDF download through the next week here.

This particular poem is a longer one for me, and engages the spirit of the Arabic poetry form “mu’allaqa” in order to express a statement of life, place, and time.

Special thanks to Kelly Davio & everyone at TLR for providing a home for this piece!

See you Friday!

José

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new poems & column!

Just a quick post to announce the release of the latest issue of Apple Valley Review which includes my two poems “Small Talk” and “Waiting!”

This issue also includes great work by Amorak Huey and Sandra Kohler among others.

Check the issue out here.

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I also wrote a bit about how introversion & extraversion relate to poetry in my latest What’s Poetry Got to Do With It? column for the Cincinnati Review blog. Check out how Emily Dickinson is even more complicated that you thought 🙂

See you Friday!

José

new poem at tinderbox poetry journal!

Just a quick post to announce the release of the latest issue of Tinderbox Poetry Journal which includes my poem “Pantoum for the Feast Day of Our Lady of Guadalupe!”

This poem is cousin to my recent microessay published at the Letras Latinas blog.

This issue of Tinderbox also includes powerful work by Su Hwang, John Sibley Williams, and Anuradha Bhowmik amongst others. Check it out here.

Special thanks to Jennifer Givhan & everyone at Tinderbox for putting together such a great issue.

See you Friday!

José

 

new poem up at Glass!

Just a quick post to announce the release of the latest issue of Glass: A Journal of Poetry! This issue features my poem “Speaking Spanish on the Streets of NYC” as well as a small paragraph giving insight into the writing of the poem.

Excited to be in great company including Caseyrenée Lopez, Kristen Brida, Rebecca Valley, and Andrew Kozma among other great writers. Check out the rest of the issue here.

Special thanks to Anthony Frame for creating such a great and supportive community!

And thank you to everyone for the warm response to my new Instagram poetry project — poetryamano!

See you Friday!

José

* new naos poem at Right Hand Pointing!

Just a quick post to announce the release of the latest issue of Right Hand Pointing which includes my poem “Naos Explains Lying.”

* naos to meet you *
* naos to be here *

This poem is another in a new series of poems in the persona of Naos, a character I explored originally in my digital chapbook Naos: an introduction which can be read online.

Special thanks to Guest Editor Brad Rose for selecting my poem and to everyone at Right Hand Pointing for letting Naos hang out for awhile more.

See you Friday!

José

 

* excerpts from a new anthology!

I Collected Dead Things As A Child – Nita Penfold

starting with insects, variegated and delicate,
pinned carefully into the cigar box —
iridescent Tiger beetle, round striped bumble bee,
green stick figure of a praying mantis —
my whispers to them went unanswered.

Then a pheasant wing with my feathers like intricate lace
in the wild thrush colors of earth;
turtle shell green and mosaic-patterned,
raw fleshy part inside rotted away;
small skull I could cradle in my hand,
its bone tarnished with a dark shine.

Each one a message from something large
that beat against my eyelids at dusk
dusting them with mystery.

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the-absence-front-cover613This week I am sharing excerpts from a new anthology offering variations on the theme of drought entitled The Absence of Something Specified which features a strong range of poets including Emily Rose Cole, Carrie Etter, John Sibley Williams, and Laura Madeline Wiseman among others. The editors have collected poems that range from a direct treatment of the subject of drought to how it plays out as a metaphor in people’s intellectual and physical lives.

The poem above navigates its meanings through both the mind and body. I’m moved by the way each stanza of the poem knocks on imagery and physicality for something beyond. Whether it is “whispers…unanswered” or the “dark shine” of bone, the absence of the anthology’s title is engaged with a near-spiritual directness and fascination. The poem ends with a turn: the speaker senses their interrogation “beat against my eyelids at dusk,” and the analytical world becomes mysterious again via physical means.

I share my own contribution to the anthology below. My poem, “Reading Hunger” (originally published in Gulf Coast), comes from my experience of reading Knut Hamsun’s stark and stoic novel, Hunger.

Special thanks to the editors – Quinton Hallet, Colette Jonopulos, Laura LeHew, and Cheryl Loetscher – for putting together such a fine collection of poems!

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Reading Hunger – José Angel Araguz

after Knut Hamsun

He calls it: the festival of what is not eternal,
then goes on describing
an old man’s eyes
as being made of dry horn,

and you can see it,
the almost animal beauty in each person
when unaware of anyone around.

Each person’s solitude bubbles up
like a spring,

a short-lived light
over rocks.

As the rock dries,
the dark gives
more and more gray.

Soon, you will be like this: rock, no water.

*

Happy bubbling!

José

* new poem at Terrain!

american-flag-795306_960_720Just a quick post to announce that my poem “American Studies” has just been published at Terrain: A Journal of the Built + Natural Environments (link includes audio)!

This poem is part of Terrain.org’s “Letter to America” Series which “presents urgent, powerful, and beautiful post-election responses from writers, artists, scientists, and thinkers across the United States.” This series so far includes contributions from a list of notable writers including JM Miller, Jane Hirshfield, and Tara L. Masih. Read more about the series here.

It means a lot to me to get this poem out into the world as it has helped me channel some of the grief, fear, and complicated emotions I’ve been dealing with post-election.

Special thanks to Simmons Buntin for the opportunity!

See you Friday!

José